Whence Is this to Me? — Ave Maria

The cloud covered the tabernacle of the testimony, and the glory of the Lord filled it. Neither could Moses go into the tabernacle of the covenant, the cloud covering all things and the majesty of the Lord shining, for the cloud had covered all. Exodus 40, 34-35 And the angel answering, said to her: The […]

Whence Is this to Me? — Ave Maria

Whence Is this to Me?

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The cloud covered the tabernacle of the testimony, and the glory
of the Lord filled it. Neither could Moses go into the tabernacle of
the covenant, the cloud covering all things and the majesty of the Lord
shining, for the cloud had covered all.
Exodus 40, 34-35

And the angel answering, said to her: The Holy Ghost shall come
upon thee, and the power of the Most High shall overshadow thee.
And therefore also the Holy which shall be born of thee shall be called
the Son of God.
Luke 1, 35

And David was afraid of the Lord that day,
saying: How shall the ark of the Lord come to me?
2 Samuel 6, 9

And whence is this to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?
For behold as soon as the voice of thy salutation sounded in my ears,
the infant in my womb leaped for joy.
Luke 1, 43-44

The word ‘type’ is derived from the Greek word tupos (τύπος) which means an impression. The Biblical term anti-type originates from the Greek word antitupos (ἀντίτυπος). This word is defined as meaning being typical of, representing by type or pattern, and corresponding to an image. An anti-type corresponds to or fulfills a type: a predictive symbol. Overall, the word tupos is thought of as an image, pattern, model, figure, or an example. Throughout sacred Scripture, we find what are called theological types.

For instance, although the Old Testament does not explicitly mention Christ, he is spoken of figuratively and allegorically. Abraham’s son Isaac and David are fulfilled in our Lord. The former represents Jesus who is the propitiation for our sins, while the latter prefigures our Lord’s victorious Davidic kingship and rule over all nations in the new and everlasting Kingdom of God. The Suffering Servant who is spoken of by the prophet Isaiah also foreshadows Christ in his passion and death. Moreover, the passage of the Israelites through the Red Sea, after God has miraculously parted it, is perceived to represent Baptism; the Holy Eucharist is seen to have been foreshadowed in the manna which comes down from heaven daily during the Israelites’ forty-year sojourn in the desert after they have been liberated from slavery in Egypt. Noah’s ark prefigures the Church, and so on.

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Biblical typology is a literary device in which the authors of the sacred texts were inspired by the Holy Spirit to use for communicating the fullness of God’s revelation and His plan of salvation in human history. Typology is a means by which God reveals Himself and His thoughts to us, so that we come to better understand what it is He desires we should know to fully relate to Him. By means of types, God intentionally captures our attention so that we focus on what they point towards. This way, we can come to see the consistency and continuation of His salvific plan and grasp its import with respect to the salvation of souls.

Of course, Biblical typology also includes reference to the Blessed Virgin Mary to draw our attention to her place and role in the Divine order of redemption. There is something about Mary in the economy of salvation that God desires to draw our complete attention to since it is an integral part of His plan to redeem the world. In the OT, we have Marian types in the figures of Sarah, Judith, and Esther among the other Hebrew Matriarchs who prefigure the mother of our Lord in some significant way. And even more remarkably, we find the Ark of the Covenant reaching its fulfillment in the person of Mary. Let us see how the Blessed Virgin and the Ark correspond to each other.

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But Josue rent his garments and fell flat on the ground before the ark
of the Lord until the evening, both he and all the ancients of Israel:
and they put dust upon their heads.
Joshua 7, 6

In ancient Judaism, the Ark of the Covenant was the only religious relic (along with the Bread of the Presence that was kept in the tabernacle of the Temple) that was venerated and even prostrated before, since it was regarded to be intrinsically holy, being the medium by which Yahweh physically manifested Himself in the glory cloud. The Ark was God’s personal dwelling place in the world, as was the Temple in Jerusalem, having no relation to anything that was regarded to be profane. The purpose for which the Ark was constructed rendered it sacred.

This holy object that was sanctified by God was made of the purest natural materials; incorruptible acacia wood (shittim) and the cleanest gold (tahor) that covered the Ark without and laced it within. The golden wreath which decorated the Ark added the final touch. The Ark was so holy, in fact, that if anyone were to touch it without having first been ritually purified, they would be struck dead, albeit any good intentions (2 Sam 6:6-7). The Ark was first kept in the Tent of Meeting (a portable temple or tabernacle) in the time of Moses and eventually housed in the Holy of Holies (inner sanctuary) in the Temple which was built by King Solomon: a perfectly clean place where the Jewish high priests could enter only once a year on the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur) according to their sacred law (Lev 16:2-4). The Ark was so sacred that even a high priest would be struck dead if he dared to enter the inner sanctuary on any other day of the year.

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Further, the Ark held the two stone tablets on which were inscribed the Ten Commandments, the budded rod of the high priest Aaron, and a golden jar of the manna that came down from heaven during the Israelites’ sojourn in the desert. When the Ark was carried in procession, it was accompanied by joyous singing, the playing of several musical instruments, and the wearing of religious vestments. The procession was an occasion for celebrating being blessed by God and receiving the grace of His faithful covenant (2 Sam. 6:3).

The Ark was also associated with God’s providential care. For instance, in the Battle of Jericho, the Ark was carried round the city’s walls seven times (figuratively the number of days God created the world) until they came tumbling down (Josh 6:11-17). And as the Levitical priests carried the Ark in procession, God caused the water of the Jordan to recede and provide a path for His chosen people, so they could cross into the Promised Land (Josh 3:2-4, 17). It was here where Joshua set up the Twelve Stones which the Israelites had to pass by to enter their new homeland. These stones themselves prefigure the twelve Apostles who were Christ’s first ministers of the sacrament of Baptism and initiation into the Church. Thus, when the Israelites venerated the Ark, they were, in fact, worshipping and praising God, for it was associated with the Divine Presence and the dispensation of His grace.

“At that time, the Savior coming from the Virgin, the Ark, brought forth His own Body into the world from that Ark, which was gilded with pure gold within by the Word, and without by the Holy Ghost; so that the truth was shown forth, and the Ark was manifested…. And the Savior came into the world bearing the incorruptible Ark, that is to say His own body.”
St. Hippolytus, In Daniel Vl
(c. A.D.205)

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And the temple of God was opened in heaven: and the ark of his
testament was seen in his temple, and there were lightnings, and voices,
and an earthquake, and great hail. And a great sign appeared in heaven:
A woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet,
and on her head a crown of twelve stars.
Revelation 11, 19… 12, 1

Since the earliest time, the Catholic Church has venerated the Blessed Virgin Mary as the Ark of the New Covenant. The first converts to the Christian faith were Jews, as were most of them in the first century during the Apostolic age. Because of their Judaic heritage, they naturally perceived Mary to be the anti-type of the Ark of the Covenant and saw its culmination in her. The parallel was so clear to them that it became a sacred tradition of the Church, one that has lasted in the Church to this present day. Just as the Israelites venerated the Ark until its disappearance prior to the Babylonian captivity in the 6th century B.C., so did the first Christian Ecclesia revere the mother of the Lord because of her personal association with the physical manifestation of God’s presence on earth in the hypostatic order of Christ’s incarnation.

Moreover, the faithful acknowledged Mary’s exceptional holiness and separation from all that was profane and even sinful, for it was she who was chosen to conceive the Divine Word made flesh in her womb by the power of the Holy Spirit (Lk 1:35; Jn 1:14). Her body could be compared not only to the incorruptible acacia wood that framed the Ark, but also to the holy Temple where the Ark was eventually kept, and her womb to the sacred sanctuary, the Holy of Holies, where the Ark was particularly concealed within the holy place. The stainless gold of the Ark drew their attention to the purity of Mary’s soul (Lk 1:46).

The connection became clear. As the mother of our Lord, Mary held not only the Divine Word, but also in his person the High Priest in the order of Melchizedek (Heb 5:8-10), and the “true manna come down from heaven” – the “Bread of Life” (Jn 6:35, 51). Mary held within her the anti-type of these sacred Christological relics. Since they find their ultimate fulfillment in the holy person of the Divine Son, so too the Ark that held them must culminate in the holy person of the Blessed Virgin Mary who conceived and bore him in her sacred womb which was his personal dwelling place.

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That this nascent Marian tradition of the Church did in fact exist is undeniably certain. In his Gospel, St. Luke draws a parallel between Mary and the Ark by alluding to persons and events found in the Book of Exodus, the Second Book of Samuel, 1 Chronicles, 1 Kings, and Zephaniah. All that the evangelist has written by Divine inspiration is drawn from what has been handed on through the Apostolic Tradition of the Church. Everything recorded in his Gospel comes from the first witnesses and servants of the spoken word or oral tradition (Lk 1:1-4).

Keeping this in mind, let us now examine what Luke has penned, as we continue to critically examine this nascent Marian tradition of the Church. Let’s see how he draws a comparison between Mary and the Ark of the Covenant in many ways by referring to persons and events in the Old Testament. We cannot help but remark the parallelism in the evangelist’s Gospel. What we are about to see is by no means just a coincidence. Rather, what we have is a fine example of Biblical typology. There is something very significant about Mary that God wants us to pay close attention to in His written word, only it isn’t mentioned explicitly or in a purely literal sense (sensus plenior). To make sense of Mary, we must read the Scriptures in more than one sense. This includes the spiritual sense (allegorical, analogical, anagogical, or moral).

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To begin, Mary arises and goes to the hill country of Judea to stay with her kinswoman Elizabeth for three months. David arises and goes to the same hill country to stay with the Ark for three months. It is in Ein Kerem where Elizabeth lives. Abu Ghosh, where the ark resides, is only a short walk apart. Mary and the Ark are both on a journey to the same hill country of Judea (2 Sam 6:1-11; Lk 1:39, 56).

In those days Mary arose and went with haste into the hill country,
to a city of Judah, and she entered the house of Zechari′ah and greeted Elizabeth.
Luke 1, 39

And David arose and went with all the people who were with him from Ba′ale-judah,
to bring up from there the ark of God, which is called by the name of the Lord of hosts who sits enthroned on the cherubim. And they carried the ark of God upon a new cart,
and brought it out of the house of Abin′adab which was on the hill.
2 Samuel 6, 2-3

John the Baptist leaps for joy in his mother’s womb at the sound of Mary’s greeting. King David leaps for joy as he dances before the Ark.

And it came to pass, that when Elizabeth heard the salutation of Mary,
the infant leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Ghost.
– Luke 1, 41

And when the ark of the Lord was come into the city of David, Michal the daughter
of Saul, looking out through a window, saw king David leaping and dancing before
the Lord: and she despised him in her heart.
– 2 Samuel 6, 16

Elizabeth deferentially asks Mary how it is that the mother of her Lord (Adonai) should come to her. Being reverential to the Lord (Adonai), David asks how it is that the Ark should come to him.

“And whence is this to me,
that the mother of my Lord should come to me?”
– Luke 1, 43

And David was afraid of the Lord that day, saying:
How shall the ark of the Lord come to me?
– 2 Samuel 6, 9

Mary stays in the house of Elizabeth for three months to look after her. The Ark is kept in the house of Obededom for three months. The Lord blesses his house and all his possessions because of the Ark’s presence. Elizabeth’s house is blessed the first instant her infant leaps in her womb at the sound of Mary’s voice. Both Mary (the new Ark of the Covenant) and the Ark of the Covenant respectively serve as moral and physical channels of divine grace.

And Mary abode with her about three months;
and she returned to her own house.
– Luke 1, 56

And the ark of the Lord abode in the house of Obededom the Gethite three months:
and the Lord blessed Obededom, and all his household.
– 2 Samuel 6, 11

And the ark of God remained in the house of Obededom three months:
and the Lord blessed his house, and all that he had.
– 1Chronicles 13, 14

Finally, Mary returns home from visiting Elizabeth and eventually goes to Jerusalem to present her infant Jesus to God in the Temple. The Ark leaves the house of Obededom and is taken to Jerusalem, where eventually the presence and glory of God is manifested in the newly built Temple. There the Ark is resting in the sacred sanctuary of the Holy of Holies.

And after eight days were accomplished, that the child should be circumcised, his name was called JESUS, which was called by the angel, before he was conceived in the womb. And after the days of her purification, according to the law of Moses, were accomplished, they carried him to Jerusalem, to present him to the Lord.
– Luke 2, 21-22

And it was told king David, that the Lord had blessed Obededom, and all that he had, because of the ark of God. So David went, and brought away the ark of God out of the house of Obededo into the city of David with joy. And there were with David seven choirs, and calves for victims.
– 2 Samuel 6, 14

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In the Greek translation of the Hebrew Old Testament, the Septuagint has the salutation chairo (χαρῆτε) for “sing aloud”. The word can mean “to be full of cheer” or “rejoice” as we have it in St. Luke’s Gospel. The reason for Mary to rejoice and be full of cheer is that God is in her midst, just as He was for Israel in the figure of Daughter Zion. But Mary’s cause for rejoicing is the fact that God has favored her to conceive and bear His Only-begotten Son. God is personally in her midst much more by being physically present in her womb. The Hebrew word for God is in Israel’s midst is qereb (keh’-rev) which literally translated means “in the womb”. Further, the same word is used elsewhere in the Hebrew OT to describe how God dwells amid His people through the Ark in a physical sense.

And coming to her the angel said,
“Rejoice, O, favoured by grace! The Lord is with you.”
– Luke 1, 28 14

καὶ εἰσελθὼν ὁ ἄγγελος πρὸς αὐτὴν εἶπεν Χαῖρε κεχαριτωμένη
ὁ κύριος μετὰ σοῦ εὐλογημένη σὺ ἐν γυναιξίν

Sing aloud, O daughter of Zion; shout, O Israel!
Rejoice and exult with all your heart, O daughter of Jerusalem!
The Lord has taken away the judgments against you,
he has cast out your enemies.
The King of Israel, the Lord, is in your midst;
you shall fear evil no more.
– Zephaniah 3, 14-16

Χαῖρε σφόδρα, θύγατερ Σιών, κήρυσσε, θύγατερ ῾Ιερουσαλήμ· εὐφραίνου καὶ κατατέρπου ἐξ ὅλης τῆς καρδίας σου, θύγατερ ῾Ιερουσαλήμ. 15 περιεῖλε Κύριος τὰ ἀδικήματά σου, λελύτρωταί σε ἐκ χειρὸς ἐχθρῶν σου· βασιλεὺς ᾿Ισραὴλ Κύριος ἐν μέσῳ σου, οὐκ ὄψῃ κακὰ οὐκέτι. 16 ἐν τῷ καιρῷ ἐκείνῳ ἐρεῖ Κύριος τῇ ῾Ιερουσαλήμ· θάρσει, Σιών, μὴ παρείσθωσαν αἱ χεῖρές σου

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Further, we read in the Septuagint version of the Book of Exodus that the Lord covered the tabernacle where the Ark was kept and filled it with His glory. This refers to the bright glory cloud (Shekinah) which the Jews believed to be a physical manifestation of God’s overshadowing spiritual presence and His word. Luke tells us in his Gospel that the power of the Most High shall “overshadow” Mary. He uses the same original Greek word episkiazo (ἐπισκιάζω) for the word ‘overshadow’ in the future tense: episkiasei (ἐπισκιάσει). It was the Holy Spirit who came upon Mary and “covered” her with His shadow, by whose power she conceived the Divine Word in the flesh. The sanctuary of her womb was filled with the glory of God, as He enveloped the temple of her body by His physical incarnation.

And the angel answered and said unto her, The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee,
and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee: therefore also that holy thing
which shall be born of thee shall be called the Son of God.
– Luke 1, 35

καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς ὁ ἄγγελος εἶπεν αὐτῇ Πνεῦμα Ἅγιον ἐπελεύσεται
ἐπὶ σέ, καὶ δύναμις Ὑψίστου ἐπισκιάσει σοι· διὸ
καὶ τὸ γεννώμενον ἅγιον κληθήσεται Υἱὸς Θεοῦ.

And Moses was not able to enter into the tabernacle of testimony, because the cloud overshadowed it, and the tabernacle was filled with the glory of the Lord.
– Exodus 40, 35

καὶ οὐκ ἠδυνάσθη Μωυσῆς εἰσελθεῖν εἰς τὴν σκηνὴν τοῦ μαρτυρίου,
ὅτι ἐπεσκίαζεν ἐπ᾿ αὐτὴν ἡ νεφέλη καὶ δόξης Κυρίοs ἐνεπλήσθη ἡ σκηνή. 

Gary G. Michuta (Making Sense of Mary: Grotto Press) cites Zechariah 2:10 to connect the verse with John 1:14. In the prophecy, God says, “I am coming to dwell among you.” The author informs us that the Greek word for “dwell” is kataskenoso, whose root word for “tent” or “tabernacle” is skene, viz., the portable tent or tabernacle that housed the Ark of the Covenant before Solomon built the Temple. In the Gospel of John (1:14), the Greek word for “dwelt” is eskenosen which is derived from the same root word skene. So, the evangelist is literally saying, “The Word became flesh and tabernacled among us.” This occurred when Mary was overshadowed by the Holy Spirit and conceived our Lord. God’s incarnated presence filled the temple of her body and the sanctuary of her womb in which He personally dwelled and filled with His glory as He had the Ark of the Covenant.

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Last but not least, the Greek word anephōnēsen / ‘ἀνεφώνησεν’ (“lift up the voice” / “cry out with a loud voice”) rarely appears in sacred Scripture. In the New Testament, it appears only once and with respect to Mary, that is in Luke 1, 42:

And she cried out with a loud voice, and said:
Blessed art thou among women,
and blessed is the fruit of thy womb.
– Luke 1, 42

καὶ ἀνεφώνησεν κραυγῇ μεγάλῃ καὶ εἶπεν Εὐλογημένη σὺ ἐν γυναιξίν,
καὶ εὐλογημένος ὁ καρπὸς τῆς κοιλίας σου.

There are only five instances in which this word is employed in the Septuagint, and on these occasions, it is in association with the Ark and Temple worship (1 Chron. 15:28; 16:4,5, 42; 2 Chron. 5:13). For instance:

So, they brought in the ark of God, and set it in the midst of the tabernacle which David pitched for it…  And he appointed before the ark of the covenant of the Lord, Levites to minister [and] lift up the voice, and to give thanks and praise the Lord God of Israel.
– 1 Chronicles 16, 1-4

καὶ ἔταξε κατὰ πρόσωπον τῆς κιβωτοῦ διαθήκης Κυρίου ἐκ τῶν Λευιτῶν
λειτουργοῦντας ἀναφωνοῦντας καὶ ἐξομολογεῖσθαι καὶ αἰνεῖν Κύριον τὸν Θεὸν ᾿Ισραήλ·

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Hence, the parallelism that we have in the Gospel of Luke clearly confirms this nascent Marian tradition of the Church which was an offshoot of Judaic belief among the first Christian faithful who received the oral word of God from the Apostles themselves. The designation of Mary being the Ark of the New Covenant is another instance of the Old Testament being fulfilled in the New Testament. Only those who are ill-acquainted with the OT and ancient Judaic tradition can easily fail to see the connection. 

As we have seen, the Ark of the Covenant was specifically created by God to carry His overshadowing presence in this world. Similarly, God created Mary to carry the Divine Word in the flesh through the overshadowing of the Holy Spirit. For the same reason, both the Ark of the Old Covenant and Mary, the Ark of the New Covenant, were made intrinsically holy by Divine mediation. As the Ark was made of pure gold within and without and of incorruptible acacia wood (which cannot be consumed by worms and insects) because it was designed to serve as God’s personal dwelling place on earth, so too God sanctified Mary’s soul when he fashioned it upon her conception and preserved her flesh free from all stain of original sin and ensuing bodily corruption.

“The prophet David danced before the Ark.  Now what else should we say the Ark was but holy Mary?  The Ark bore within it the tables of the Testament, but Mary bore the Heir of the same Testament itself. The former contained in it the Law, the latter the Gospel.  The one had the voice of God, the other His Word.  The Ark, indeed, was radiant within and without with the glitter of gold, but holy Mary shone within and without with the splendor of virginity.  The one was adorned with earthly gold, the other with heavenly.”
St. Ambrose, Serm. xlii. 6, Int. Opp., S. Ambrosiiz
(ante. A.D. 397)

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Arise, O Lord, into thy resting place:
thou and the ark, which thou hast sanctified.
Psalm 132, 8

Besides the Perpetual Virginity of Mary, the Marian dogma of the Immaculate Conception and its corollary the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary body and soul into Heaven find their integrity in Mary’s designation of being the Ark of the New Covenant. We read in Luke 1:28, that Mary was called completely and perfectly sanctified or justified by divine grace with a permanent result (kecharitomene). She had no cause to fear the Divine Justice, for she had found favor with God (Lk. 1:30; cf. Isa 61:10). Not unlike a restored Daughter Zion, Mary was “clothed with a robe of salvation” and “wrapped in a mantle of justice” (Isa 61:10). God had looked upon the lowliness of His handmaiden and did great things to her because she was chosen to be God’s personal dwelling place in His physical manifestation, her body being His holy Temple and her womb His sacred sanctuary. Thus, all generations shall call the Virgin Mary blessed, for God has done great things to her, and holy is His name (Lk 1:46-49).

As with all Catholic Marian doctrines and dogmas, our fuller understanding of Mary’s role in the economy of salvation serves to better illuminate our understanding and deepen our appreciation for her divine Son. Mary’s role as the Ark of the New Covenant underscores the divine truth of who Jesus Christ is: one divine Person in the flesh with both a divine and a human nature hypostatically united, but nonetheless distinct from each other.

In the words of St. Hippolytus (200 A.D.): “For whereas the Word of God was without flesh, He took upon Himself the holy flesh (the true manna come down from Heaven) by the holy Virgin.” Mary was made holy by the grace of God, for she was predestined to be overshadowed by the Holy Spirit and carry the Divine Presence in the sanctuary of her womb. She truly is the new Ark who was “overlaid with pure gold with the Word within and the Holy Spirit without.” St. Gregory Thaumaturgus (c. A.D. 260) concurs: The Ark of the Covenant is truly fulfilled in the holy Virgin Mother, “gilded within and without,” having “received the treasure of sanctification.” St. Dionysius of Alexandria testifies in accord with this sacred Tradition of the Church: “As Christ, our Priest was not chosen by the hand of man, so neither was His tabernacle framed by men, but was established by the Holy Spirit; and by the power of God is that tabernacle protected” from all putridity and corruption, “to be had in everlasting remembrance, Mary, God’s Virgin Mother.”

“Behold one in truth, the handmaid of the Lord.  Holy she is, in whom is no guile, all simplicity…. The spouse of Christ is the ark of the covenant, within and without overlaid with gold, a keeper of the law of the Lord. As in the ark there was nothing but the tables of the Testament, so too in thee no one from outside should be thought of.  Over this propitiatory, as though upon the Cherubim, the Lord is pleased to sit…The Apostle thus defines a virgin, that she should be holy in body and in spirit.”
St. Jerome, Epist. Xxii.
(ante A.D. 420)

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And Joshua said to the priests, “Take up the ark of the covenant
and pass on before the people.” So they took up the ark of the covenant
 and went before the people.
Joshua 3, 6

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Ave Maria!

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  1. samo lucijavery good explenation love it GOD BLESS YOU .svaki zupnik triba ovako kako frende iz ukrajne SADA blagoslivlja svoju zajednicu zupe moja HKM STEPINACSt. Hildegard’s secret to a healthy dietShutterstockShare 5Edifa | Apr 20, 2020There is wise advice in some of this saint’s nutritional writing that we can use even today in confinement.Staying healthy and fit in lockdown isn’t easy. There is the ever-present danger of over-eating, consuming unhealthy foods, and gaining extra pounds. We can look to a herbalist and saint named St. Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) for a little wisdom.Hildegard wrote a lot about the virtues of plants and natural foods. In the Hippocratic tradition she prioritized preventive medicine and remedies based on plants. She believed her dietary method allowed a person to feel truly sated while cleansing their liver and intestines, eliminating “black bile,” purifying blood, and maintaining a cheerful disposition.“St. Hildegard simply steers us in the direction of foods apt to improve our vitality,” explains Corinne Graux, a French homeopath. While you should always consult with your health care professionals or a nutritionist about your diet, it’s interesting to consider the dietary advice of Hildegard, as some of it is still worth following today.Avoid “standard” dietsAs a good nutritionist, St. Hildegard had no appetite for standard diets. What’s good for one person is not necessarily beneficial for another. She advocated a personal diet plan based on individual’s health, age, and season.For Hildegard and her contemporaries, everything was a matter of “balancing humors.” She believed a human being, like earth, requires quantities of “lubricants.” This balance was based on the right proportions of hot, cold, dry, and wet foods as much as on good thoughts and deeds. Hence, the saint recommended drinking water (or wine) at mealtime and serving dishes with dressings, meat, or vegetable sauces to prevent food from “drying” the stomach and perturbing digestion. For example, wine vinegar possesses the properties for maintaining the pH in the stomach and intestines, and also prevents the development of blood clots in the arteries.Selecting foods with curative propertiesAccording to Hildegard, “spelt is the very best grain. It provided for good flesh and good blood as well as a cheerful disposition.” Spelt (a distinct form of wheat) cultivation dates back to 10 BC; it was replaced by other wheat in the 20th century. Some 30 years ago, the culture was revived by organic farmers. Having escaped the “selection pressures,” some say its gluten does not attack the intestinal barrier. But specialists still only recommend pure spelt (not having been crossed with other cultures) from certified producers. Some say it’s easier to digest, rich in micro-nutrients, vitamins and prebiotics. In addition, spelt is a good anti-inflammatory and a natural anti-depressant that stimulates the immune system. There are multiple ways to prepare it: porridge, bread, and in desserts.Other foods warmly recommended by Hildegard include: fennel (for its antispasmodic, diuretic and disinfecting properties), chestnuts, green beans and various squashes (zucchinis, red kuri squash, etc.), steamed root vegetables (carrot, parsnip, turnip and celery), onions (always cooked), garlic both fresh and dried, almonds, dates, liver (fried), quinces, Cornelian cherries, apples, and pears. The four indispensable spices used in 11th-century cooking were Spanish chamomile, hyssop, galangal (similar to ginger), and wild thyme.Consume certain foods in moderationSome experts advise that healthy individuals moderate their consumption of tomatoes, eggplant, bell peppers, and potatoes, because of a toxic compound solanine. The same kind of moderation applies to fatty fish (trout, salmon and sardine) destined for healthy individuals. “If a healthy strong person consuming them can be cured and purified with black radish, they will be dangerous for a thin, sickly individual,” observed St. Hildegard. But the same stout person would secrete a putrid substance upon overindulging in honey, she said. Healthy individuals were allowed some milk (preferably in winter time, after it had been macerated with nettles to reduce “harmful juices”). As to pork, she believed its “hot” nature made it toxic for human consumption. (Sorry, bacon lovers!)Toxic foodsHildegard didn’t appreciate leeks, shallots, peaches, plums (unless soaked in wine), strawberries, and fresh vegetables (with the exception of green salad with dressing). She deemed all these foods toxic. According to her, people should also say goodbye to cabbage (bad for digestion), certain kinds of mushrooms, watermelons, and lentils. All these foods are considered healthy by today’s standards, though some people may not tolerate any number of them for various reasons.DietingHildegard was against strict diets leading to loss of both physical and spiritual strength. Instead, in order to let the body rest, she recommended avoiding rich foods at least once a year. According to her, dieting could take the following forms: a bowl of rice or soup with spelt and fennel tea in the evening once or twice a week or a three- or seven-day-long diet alternating pasta and spelt soup with cooked fruit for dessert.Diane GautretRead more:7 Healthy foods that Jesus ateRead more:St. Hildegard’s advice for building healthy self-confidenceThe Novena to St. Catherine of Siena starts today: Here’s why you should pray itCATHERINE OF SIENAPublic DomainShare 245Fr. Patrick Briscoe, OP | Apr 20, 202080% of the population of Siena died the year after her birth because of the Bubonic Plague!The Bubonic plague arrived in Sicily the same year that St. Catherine of Siena was born. The following year, 1348, eighty percent of the population of Siena would die from the disease.Outbreaks of the disease would continue throughout Catherine’s life. One Sienese chronicle reports, “And no bells tolled, and nobody wept no matter what his loss because almost everyone expected death… And people said and believed, ‘This is the end of the world.’” It was a time of philosophical cynicism, political instability, and extraordinary suffering.And yet this was the scene for Catherine’s discovery of her vocation to love God and to love her neighbor.Catherine spent three years of her life in solitude, growing in an intimate relationship with God. This monastic time was filled with many graces and intense prayer. Catherine feared that if she were to re-enter an active, apostolic life (engaging again in worldly affairs), that her relationship with God would suffer.The Lord told Catherine, however,I have no intention of parting you from myself, but rather of making sure to bind you to me all the closer by the bond of your love for your neighbor. Remember I have laid down two commandments of love: love of me and love of your neighbor… It is the justice of these two commandments that I want you now to fulfill. On two feet you must walk my way (Life of St. Catherine of Siena by Raymond of Capua).The marriage of the two great commandments became the rule of her own life. After her years of solitary prayer, Catherine gave herself over to caring for the poor and the sick. Catherine desired to be a servant of others because Christ had been the servant of all and redeemed humanity by his precious blood.In a letter to Caterina di Scetto, another laywoman who belonged to the mantellate in Siena, Catherine describes her vision of charity saying,Take care not to love your neighbor for your own profit, for that would not be responding to the love which God has for you. For as God has loved you gratuitously so he wills that since you cannot love him in this way, you would do so toward your neighbors, loving them, as I said, gratuitously and not as a debt.”For Catherine love of God is where our virtues begin, and in our love of neighbor they come alive. Because this love comes from God, it must be without constraint.Catherine could love in this way because of her total trust in Divine Providence. In a particularly moving passage in her Dialogue, Catherine hears the Lord say to her,Everything was made by me, and without me nothing can exist. Therefore, if it is beauty you want, I am beauty. If you want goodness, I am goodness, for I am supremely good. I am wisdom. I am kind; I am compassionate; I am the just and merciful God.So often charity is inhibited because of a lack of trust in what the Lord is doing. Hearts are held back, growth is stunted by the shadows of doubt that all things belong to the Lord and were redeemed by his blood.As we begin to long for life “post quarantine”; as our neighbors continue to be in need; as we pray for the Church, hoping for renewal in life and vigor, like Catherine, we have to confidently hand everything over to Christ.Despite plague, isolation, the complications of her own family life, and the political turmoil of her day, Catherine gave herself over to love of God and love of neighbor.https://www.youtube.com/embed/BsiXb2Rcvuo?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&autohide=2&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparentMay this novena — which begins April 20 to end on her April 29 feast day — give us the same grace!Novena Prayer:Heavenly Father, your glory is in your saints. We praise your glory in the life of the admirable St. Catherine of Siena, virgin and doctor of the Church. Her whole life was a noble sacrifice inspired by an ardent love of Jesus, your unblemished Lamb.In troubled times she strenuously upheld the rights of His beloved spouse, the Church. Father, honor her merits and hear her prayers for each of us, and for our whole parish family. Help us to pass unscathed through the corruption of this world, and to remain unshakably faithful to the Church in word, deed, and example.Help us always to see in the Vicar of Christ an anchor in the storms of life, and a beacon of light to the harbor of your Love, in this dark night of your times and men’s souls. Grant also to each of us our special petition . . . (State your own intentions)We ask this through Jesus, your Son, in the bond of the Holy Spirit. Amen. St. Catherine of Siena, Pray for us.Read more:How the Church’s Easter prayer to Mary brought the end of the plagueRead more:4 Inspiring women who are “Doctors of the Church”
  2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1aYDCmBehMA

Published by samo lucija

http://glasnik-sim.hr/prvi-dan-devetnice/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeKuqtTT1H PRESVETO TIJELO I KRV KRISTOVA. TIJELOVO Svetkovina (četvrtak nakon Presv. Trojstva) VEČERNJA MOLITVA Isuse, ostavio si nam Sebe u sakramentu svoga Tijela i Krvi. Dao si nam neizreciv dar. Dar bogat ljubavlju. Darovao si nam čitavog Sebe. Hvala Ti, Isuse. Hvala Ti, Isuse, što si oduvijek bio čovjek blizine. Uz Tebe se svatko osjećao prihvaćen i ljubljen. Nitko nije imao dojam da si ga olako shvatio ili površno slušao. I danas je tako, Isuse. Utaži, Gospodine, moju glad za osobom povjerenja, osobom koja ima vremena i ljubavi za drugoga. Osobom koja ne važe, koja ne mjeri, koja nije zaokupljena prvenstveno sobom. Koja zna čuti nečije teškoće i onda kada samo šutnja progovara. Osobom koja će bez uvrijeđenosti saslušati ono što možda i ne želi čuti. Pomozi mi da tu osobu tražim jedino u Tebi. Znaš i sam koliko sam puta ranjena zbog neprisutnosti osoba koje bi mi trebale biti blizu. Razočarana jer se netko od najbližih ne sjeti da mi je potreban ili se ne sjeti nečega što nije trebao previdjeti. Boli me kada primijetim da me netko uopće ne sluša ili me potpuno ignorira. Gospodine, pomozi mi ispuniti te praznine. Pomozi mi drugome biti poput Tebe. Biti netko tko zna drugome biti blizak, tko zna biti bližnji. Biti netko tko ima vremena i ljubavi za drugoga. Isuse, održao si svoje obećanje da ćeš biti s nama u sve dane do svršetka svijeta. Dao si nam sebe u Kruhu života. Na Tebe više nitko ne mora čekati, Isuse, u svakom času si sama prisutnost. Na svakoj Misi, u svakoj Pričesti. Hvala Ti, Isuse, na tom daru. Hvala ti što se i meni daruješ svojim Tijelom i svojom Krvlju. Više nisam sama, nisam prepuštena samoj sebi. Hvala Ti, Isuse …

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1 Comment

  1. Evanđelje:Iv 3 , 7b-15

    Nitko nije uzašao na nebo doli onaj koji siđe s neba, Sin Čovječji.

    Čitanje svetog Evanđelja po Ivanu

    U ono vrijeme reče Isus Nikodemu:

    »Treba da se rodite nanovo, odozgor.

    Vjetar puše gdje hoće;

    čuješ mu šum,

    a ne znaš odakle dolazi i kamo ide.

    Tako je sa svakim

    koji je rođen od Duha.«

    Upita ga Nikodem: »Kako se to može zbiti?«

    Odgovori mu Isus: »Ti si učitelj u Izraelu pa to da ne razumiješ?

    Zaista, zaista, kažem ti:

    govorimo što znamo,

    svjedočimo za ono što vidjesmo,

    ali svjedočanstva našega ne primate.

    Ako vam rekoh zemaljsko

    pa ne vjerujete,

    kako ćete vjerovati

    kad vam budem govorio nebesko?

    Nitko nije uzašao na nebo

    doli onaj koji siđe s neba,

    Sin Čovječji.

    I kao što je Mojsije podigao zmiju u pustinji

    tako ima biti podignut Sin Čovječji

    da svaki koji vjeruje,

    u njemu ima život vječni.«

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    The cloud covered the tabernacle of the testimony, and the glory of the Lord filled it. Neither could Moses go into the tabernacle of the covenant, the cloud covering all things and the majesty of the Lord shining, for the cloud had covered all. Exodus 40, 34-35 And the angel answering, said to her: The […]

    Whence Is this to Me? — Ave Maria

    Whence Is this to Me?

    5h ago

    ob_7125d8_99fac-arkofthecovenant

    The cloud covered the tabernacle of the testimony, and the glory

    of the Lord filled it. Neither could Moses go into the tabernacle of

    the covenant, the cloud covering all things and the majesty of the Lord

    shining, for the cloud had covered all.

    Exodus 40, 34-35

    And the angel answering, said to her: The Holy Ghost shall come

    upon thee, and the power of the Most High shall overshadow thee.

    And therefore also the Holy which shall be born of thee shall be called

    the Son of God.

    Luke 1, 35

    And David was afraid of the Lord that day,

    saying: How shall the ark of the Lord come to me?

    2 Samuel 6, 9

    And whence is this to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?

    For behold as soon as the voice of thy salutation sounded in my ears,

    the infant in my womb leaped for joy.

    Luke 1, 43-44

    The word ‘type’ is derived from the Greek word tupos (τύπος) which means an impression. The Biblical term anti-type originates from the Greek word antitupos (ἀντίτυπος). This word is defined as meaning being typical of, representing by type or pattern, and corresponding to an image. An anti-type corresponds to or fulfills a type: a predictive symbol. Overall, the word tupos is thought of as an image, pattern, model, figure, or an example. Throughout sacred Scripture, we find what are called theological types.

    For instance, although the Old Testament does not explicitly mention Christ, he is spoken of figuratively and allegorically. Abraham’s son Isaac and David are fulfilled in our Lord. The former represents Jesus who is the propitiation for our sins, while the latter prefigures our Lord’s victorious Davidic kingship and rule over all nations in the new and everlasting Kingdom of God. The Suffering Servant who is spoken of by the prophet Isaiah also foreshadows Christ in his passion and death. Moreover, the passage of the Israelites through the Red Sea, after God has miraculously parted it, is perceived to represent Baptism; the Holy Eucharist is seen to have been foreshadowed in the manna which comes down from heaven daily during the Israelites’ forty-year sojourn in the desert after they have been liberated from slavery in Egypt. Noah’s ark prefigures the Church, and so on.

    ob_69ada9_a17d83-3c0a9e51b1274104816e970976498c1

    Biblical typology is a literary device in which the authors of the sacred texts were inspired by the Holy Spirit to use for communicating the fullness of God’s revelation and His plan of salvation in human history. Typology is a means by which God reveals Himself and His thoughts to us, so that we come to better understand what it is He desires we should know to fully relate to Him. By means of types, God intentionally captures our attention so that we focus on what they point towards. This way, we can come to see the consistency and continuation of His salvific plan and grasp its import with respect to the salvation of souls.

    Of course, Biblical typology also includes reference to the Blessed Virgin Mary to draw our attention to her place and role in the Divine order of redemption. There is something about Mary in the economy of salvation that God desires to draw our complete attention to since it is an integral part of His plan to redeem the world. In the OT, we have Marian types in the figures of Sarah, Judith, and Esther among the other Hebrew Matriarchs who prefigure the mother of our Lord in some significant way. And even more remarkably, we find the Ark of the Covenant reaching its fulfillment in the person of Mary. Let us see how the Blessed Virgin and the Ark correspond to each other.

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    But Josue rent his garments and fell flat on the ground before the ark

    of the Lord until the evening, both he and all the ancients of Israel:

    and they put dust upon their heads.

    Joshua 7, 6

    In ancient Judaism, the Ark of the Covenant was the only religious relic (along with the Bread of the Presence that was kept in the tabernacle of the Temple) that was venerated and even prostrated before, since it was regarded to be intrinsically holy, being the medium by which Yahweh physically manifested Himself in the glory cloud. The Ark was God’s personal dwelling place in the world, as was the Temple in Jerusalem, having no relation to anything that was regarded to be profane. The purpose for which the Ark was constructed rendered it sacred.

    This holy object that was sanctified by God was made of the purest natural materials; incorruptible acacia wood (shittim) and the cleanest gold (tahor) that covered the Ark without and laced it within. The golden wreath which decorated the Ark added the final touch. The Ark was so holy, in fact, that if anyone were to touch it without having first been ritually purified, they would be struck dead, albeit any good intentions (2 Sam 6:6-7). The Ark was first kept in the Tent of Meeting (a portable temple or tabernacle) in the time of Moses and eventually housed in the Holy of Holies (inner sanctuary) in the Temple which was built by King Solomon: a perfectly clean place where the Jewish high priests could enter only once a year on the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur) according to their sacred law (Lev 16:2-4). The Ark was so sacred that even a high priest would be struck dead if he dared to enter the inner sanctuary on any other day of the year.

    ob_a5ac6d_a17d83-896e4e18c69b4b64a0194a2361aaac8.png

    Further, the Ark held the two stone tablets on which were inscribed the Ten Commandments, the budded rod of the high priest Aaron, and a golden jar of the manna that came down from heaven during the Israelites’ sojourn in the desert. When the Ark was carried in procession, it was accompanied by joyous singing, the playing of several musical instruments, and the wearing of religious vestments. The procession was an occasion for celebrating being blessed by God and receiving the grace of His faithful covenant (2 Sam. 6:3).

    The Ark was also associated with God’s providential care. For instance, in the Battle of Jericho, the Ark was carried round the city’s walls seven times (figuratively the number of days God created the world) until they came tumbling down (Josh 6:11-17). And as the Levitical priests carried the Ark in procession, God caused the water of the Jordan to recede and provide a path for His chosen people, so they could cross into the Promised Land (Josh 3:2-4, 17). It was here where Joshua set up the Twelve Stones which the Israelites had to pass by to enter their new homeland. These stones themselves prefigure the twelve Apostles who were Christ’s first ministers of the sacrament of Baptism and initiation into the Church. Thus, when the Israelites venerated the Ark, they were, in fact, worshipping and praising God, for it was associated with the Divine Presence and the dispensation of His grace.

    “At that time, the Savior coming from the Virgin, the Ark, brought forth His own Body into the world from that Ark, which was gilded with pure gold within by the Word, and without by the Holy Ghost; so that the truth was shown forth, and the Ark was manifested…. And the Savior came into the world bearing the incorruptible Ark, that is to say His own body.”

    St. Hippolytus, In Daniel Vl

    (c. A.D.205)

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    And the temple of God was opened in heaven: and the ark of his

    testament was seen in his temple, and there were lightnings, and voices,

    and an earthquake, and great hail. And a great sign appeared in heaven:

    A woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet,

    and on her head a crown of twelve stars.

    Revelation 11, 19… 12, 1

    Since the earliest time, the Catholic Church has venerated the Blessed Virgin Mary as the Ark of the New Covenant. The first converts to the Christian faith were Jews, as were most of them in the first century during the Apostolic age. Because of their Judaic heritage, they naturally perceived Mary to be the anti-type of the Ark of the Covenant and saw its culmination in her. The parallel was so clear to them that it became a sacred tradition of the Church, one that has lasted in the Church to this present day. Just as the Israelites venerated the Ark until its disappearance prior to the Babylonian captivity in the 6th century B.C., so did the first Christian Ecclesia revere the mother of the Lord because of her personal association with the physical manifestation of God’s presence on earth in the hypostatic order of Christ’s incarnation.

    Moreover, the faithful acknowledged Mary’s exceptional holiness and separation from all that was profane and even sinful, for it was she who was chosen to conceive the Divine Word made flesh in her womb by the power of the Holy Spirit (Lk 1:35; Jn 1:14). Her body could be compared not only to the incorruptible acacia wood that framed the Ark, but also to the holy Temple where the Ark was eventually kept, and her womb to the sacred sanctuary, the Holy of Holies, where the Ark was particularly concealed within the holy place. The stainless gold of the Ark drew their attention to the purity of Mary’s soul (Lk 1:46).

    The connection became clear. As the mother of our Lord, Mary held not only the Divine Word, but also in his person the High Priest in the order of Melchizedek (Heb 5:8-10), and the “true manna come down from heaven” – the “Bread of Life” (Jn 6:35, 51). Mary held within her the anti-type of these sacred Christological relics. Since they find their ultimate fulfillment in the holy person of the Divine Son, so too the Ark that held them must culminate in the holy person of the Blessed Virgin Mary who conceived and bore him in her sacred womb which was his personal dwelling place.

    mary

    That this nascent Marian tradition of the Church did in fact exist is undeniably certain. In his Gospel, St. Luke draws a parallel between Mary and the Ark by alluding to persons and events found in the Book of Exodus, the Second Book of Samuel, 1 Chronicles, 1 Kings, and Zephaniah. All that the evangelist has written by Divine inspiration is drawn from what has been handed on through the Apostolic Tradition of the Church. Everything recorded in his Gospel comes from the first witnesses and servants of the spoken word or oral tradition (Lk 1:1-4).

    Keeping this in mind, let us now examine what Luke has penned, as we continue to critically examine this nascent Marian tradition of the Church. Let’s see how he draws a comparison between Mary and the Ark of the Covenant in many ways by referring to persons and events in the Old Testament. We cannot help but remark the parallelism in the evangelist’s Gospel. What we are about to see is by no means just a coincidence. Rather, what we have is a fine example of Biblical typology. There is something very significant about Mary that God wants us to pay close attention to in His written word, only it isn’t mentioned explicitly or in a purely literal sense (sensus plenior). To make sense of Mary, we must read the Scriptures in more than one sense. This includes the spiritual sense (allegorical, analogical, anagogical, or moral).

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    To begin, Mary arises and goes to the hill country of Judea to stay with her kinswoman Elizabeth for three months. David arises and goes to the same hill country to stay with the Ark for three months. It is in Ein Kerem where Elizabeth lives. Abu Ghosh, where the ark resides, is only a short walk apart. Mary and the Ark are both on a journey to the same hill country of Judea (2 Sam 6:1-11; Lk 1:39, 56).

    In those days Mary arose and went with haste into the hill country,

    to a city of Judah, and she entered the house of Zechari′ah and greeted Elizabeth.

    Luke 1, 39

    And David arose and went with all the people who were with him from Ba′ale-judah,

    to bring up from there the ark of God, which is called by the name of the Lord of hosts who sits enthroned on the cherubim. And they carried the ark of God upon a new cart,

    and brought it out of the house of Abin′adab which was on the hill.

    2 Samuel 6, 2-3

    John the Baptist leaps for joy in his mother’s womb at the sound of Mary’s greeting. King David leaps for joy as he dances before the Ark.

    And it came to pass, that when Elizabeth heard the salutation of Mary,

    the infant leaped in her womb. And Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Ghost.

    – Luke 1, 41

    And when the ark of the Lord was come into the city of David, Michal the daughter

    of Saul, looking out through a window, saw king David leaping and dancing before

    the Lord: and she despised him in her heart.

    – 2 Samuel 6, 16

    Elizabeth deferentially asks Mary how it is that the mother of her Lord (Adonai) should come to her. Being reverential to the Lord (Adonai), David asks how it is that the Ark should come to him.

    “And whence is this to me,

    that the mother of my Lord should come to me?”

    – Luke 1, 43

    And David was afraid of the Lord that day, saying:

    How shall the ark of the Lord come to me?

    – 2 Samuel 6, 9

    Mary stays in the house of Elizabeth for three months to look after her. The Ark is kept in the house of Obededom for three months. The Lord blesses his house and all his possessions because of the Ark’s presence. Elizabeth’s house is blessed the first instant her infant leaps in her womb at the sound of Mary’s voice. Both Mary (the new Ark of the Covenant) and the Ark of the Covenant respectively serve as moral and physical channels of divine grace.

    And Mary abode with her about three months;

    and she returned to her own house.

    – Luke 1, 56

    And the ark of the Lord abode in the house of Obededom the Gethite three months:

    and the Lord blessed Obededom, and all his household.

    – 2 Samuel 6, 11

    And the ark of God remained in the house of Obededom three months:

    and the Lord blessed his house, and all that he had.

    – 1Chronicles 13, 14

    Finally, Mary returns home from visiting Elizabeth and eventually goes to Jerusalem to present her infant Jesus to God in the Temple. The Ark leaves the house of Obededom and is taken to Jerusalem, where eventually the presence and glory of God is manifested in the newly built Temple. There the Ark is resting in the sacred sanctuary of the Holy of Holies.

    And after eight days were accomplished, that the child should be circumcised, his name was called JESUS, which was called by the angel, before he was conceived in the womb. And after the days of her purification, according to the law of Moses, were accomplished, they carried him to Jerusalem, to present him to the Lord.

    – Luke 2, 21-22

    And it was told king David, that the Lord had blessed Obededom, and all that he had, because of the ark of God. So David went, and brought away the ark of God out of the house of Obededo into the city of David with joy. And there were with David seven choirs, and calves for victims.

    – 2 Samuel 6, 14

    ob_f241e9_mary-pregnant-with-jesus-orig

    In the Greek translation of the Hebrew Old Testament, the Septuagint has the salutation chairo (χαρῆτε) for “sing aloud”. The word can mean “to be full of cheer” or “rejoice” as we have it in St. Luke’s Gospel. The reason for Mary to rejoice and be full of cheer is that God is in her midst, just as He was for Israel in the figure of Daughter Zion. But Mary’s cause for rejoicing is the fact that God has favored her to conceive and bear His Only-begotten Son. God is personally in her midst much more by being physically present in her womb. The Hebrew word for God is in Israel’s midst is qereb (keh’-rev) which literally translated means “in the womb”. Further, the same word is used elsewhere in the Hebrew OT to describe how God dwells amid His people through the Ark in a physical sense.

    And coming to her the angel said,

    “Rejoice, O, favoured by grace! The Lord is with you.”

    – Luke 1, 28 14

    καὶ εἰσελθὼν ὁ ἄγγελος πρὸς αὐτὴν εἶπεν Χαῖρε κεχαριτωμένη

    ὁ κύριος μετὰ σοῦ εὐλογημένη σὺ ἐν γυναιξίν

    Sing aloud, O daughter of Zion; shout, O Israel!

    Rejoice and exult with all your heart, O daughter of Jerusalem!

    The Lord has taken away the judgments against you,

    he has cast out your enemies.

    The King of Israel, the Lord, is in your midst;

    you shall fear evil no more.

    – Zephaniah 3, 14-16

    Χαῖρε σφόδρα, θύγατερ Σιών, κήρυσσε, θύγατερ ῾Ιερουσαλήμ· εὐφραίνου καὶ κατατέρπου ἐξ ὅλης τῆς καρδίας σου, θύγατερ ῾Ιερουσαλήμ. 15 περιεῖλε Κύριος τὰ ἀδικήματά σου, λελύτρωταί σε ἐκ χειρὸς ἐχθρῶν σου· βασιλεὺς ᾿Ισραὴλ Κύριος ἐν μέσῳ σου, οὐκ ὄψῃ κακὰ οὐκέτι. 16 ἐν τῷ καιρῷ ἐκείνῳ ἐρεῖ Κύριος τῇ ῾Ιερουσαλήμ· θάρσει, Σιών, μὴ παρείσθωσαν αἱ χεῖρές σου

    ob_adeff0_ob-86185c-jesus-in-mary-womb1

    Further, we read in the Septuagint version of the Book of Exodus that the Lord covered the tabernacle where the Ark was kept and filled it with His glory. This refers to the bright glory cloud (Shekinah) which the Jews believed to be a physical manifestation of God’s overshadowing spiritual presence and His word. Luke tells us in his Gospel that the power of the Most High shall “overshadow” Mary. He uses the same original Greek word episkiazo (ἐπισκιάζω) for the word ‘overshadow’ in the future tense: episkiasei (ἐπισκιάσει). It was the Holy Spirit who came upon Mary and “covered” her with His shadow, by whose power she conceived the Divine Word in the flesh. The sanctuary of her womb was filled with the glory of God, as He enveloped the temple of her body by His physical incarnation.

    And the angel answered and said unto her, The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee,

    and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee: therefore also that holy thing

    which shall be born of thee shall be called the Son of God.

    – Luke 1, 35

    καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς ὁ ἄγγελος εἶπεν αὐτῇ Πνεῦμα Ἅγιον ἐπελεύσεται

    ἐπὶ σέ, καὶ δύναμις Ὑψίστου ἐπισκιάσει σοι· διὸ

    καὶ τὸ γεννώμενον ἅγιον κληθήσεται Υἱὸς Θεοῦ.

    And Moses was not able to enter into the tabernacle of testimony, because the cloud overshadowed it, and the tabernacle was filled with the glory of the Lord.

    – Exodus 40, 35

    καὶ οὐκ ἠδυνάσθη Μωυσῆς εἰσελθεῖν εἰς τὴν σκηνὴν τοῦ μαρτυρίου,

    ὅτι ἐπεσκίαζεν ἐπ᾿ αὐτὴν ἡ νεφέλη καὶ δόξης Κυρίοs ἐνεπλήσθη ἡ σκηνή.

    Gary G. Michuta (Making Sense of Mary: Grotto Press) cites Zechariah 2:10 to connect the verse with John 1:14. In the prophecy, God says, “I am coming to dwell among you.” The author informs us that the Greek word for “dwell” is kataskenoso, whose root word for “tent” or “tabernacle” is skene, viz., the portable tent or tabernacle that housed the Ark of the Covenant before Solomon built the Temple. In the Gospel of John (1:14), the Greek word for “dwelt” is eskenosen which is derived from the same root word skene. So, the evangelist is literally saying, “The Word became flesh and tabernacled among us.” This occurred when Mary was overshadowed by the Holy Spirit and conceived our Lord. God’s incarnated presence filled the temple of her body and the sanctuary of her womb in which He personally dwelled and filled with His glory as He had the Ark of the Covenant.

    74b3b-mary-and-elizabeth

    Last but not least, the Greek word anephōnēsen / ‘ἀνεφώνησεν’ (“lift up the voice” / “cry out with a loud voice”) rarely appears in sacred Scripture. In the New Testament, it appears only once and with respect to Mary, that is in Luke 1, 42:

    And she cried out with a loud voice, and said:

    Blessed art thou among women,

    and blessed is the fruit of thy womb.

    – Luke 1, 42

    καὶ ἀνεφώνησεν κραυγῇ μεγάλῃ καὶ εἶπεν Εὐλογημένη σὺ ἐν γυναιξίν,

    καὶ εὐλογημένος ὁ καρπὸς τῆς κοιλίας σου.

    There are only five instances in which this word is employed in the Septuagint, and on these occasions, it is in association with the Ark and Temple worship (1 Chron. 15:28; 16:4,5, 42; 2 Chron. 5:13). For instance:

    So, they brought in the ark of God, and set it in the midst of the tabernacle which David pitched for it… And he appointed before the ark of the covenant of the Lord, Levites to minister [and] lift up the voice, and to give thanks and praise the Lord God of Israel.

    – 1 Chronicles 16, 1-4

    καὶ ἔταξε κατὰ πρόσωπον τῆς κιβωτοῦ διαθήκης Κυρίου ἐκ τῶν Λευιτῶν

    λειτουργοῦντας ἀναφωνοῦντας καὶ ἐξομολογεῖσθαι καὶ αἰνεῖν Κύριον τὸν Θεὸν ᾿Ισραήλ·

    virgin_pregnantlight

    Hence, the parallelism that we have in the Gospel of Luke clearly confirms this nascent Marian tradition of the Church which was an offshoot of Judaic belief among the first Christian faithful who received the oral word of God from the Apostles themselves. The designation of Mary being the Ark of the New Covenant is another instance of the Old Testament being fulfilled in the New Testament. Only those who are ill-acquainted with the OT and ancient Judaic tradition can easily fail to see the connection.

    As we have seen, the Ark of the Covenant was specifically created by God to carry His overshadowing presence in this world. Similarly, God created Mary to carry the Divine Word in the flesh through the overshadowing of the Holy Spirit. For the same reason, both the Ark of the Old Covenant and Mary, the Ark of the New Covenant, were made intrinsically holy by Divine mediation. As the Ark was made of pure gold within and without and of incorruptible acacia wood (which cannot be consumed by worms and insects) because it was designed to serve as God’s personal dwelling place on earth, so too God sanctified Mary’s soul when he fashioned it upon her conception and preserved her flesh free from all stain of original sin and ensuing bodily corruption.

    “The prophet David danced before the Ark. Now what else should we say the Ark was but holy Mary? The Ark bore within it the tables of the Testament, but Mary bore the Heir of the same Testament itself. The former contained in it the Law, the latter the Gospel. The one had the voice of God, the other His Word. The Ark, indeed, was radiant within and without with the glitter of gold, but holy Mary shone within and without with the splendor of virginity. The one was adorned with earthly gold, the other with heavenly.”

    St. Ambrose, Serm. xlii. 6, Int. Opp., S. Ambrosiiz

    (ante. A.D. 397)

    th43FM2D9E

    Arise, O Lord, into thy resting place:

    thou and the ark, which thou hast sanctified.

    Psalm 132, 8

    Besides the Perpetual Virginity of Mary, the Marian dogma of the Immaculate Conception and its corollary the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary body and soul into Heaven find their integrity in Mary’s designation of being the Ark of the New Covenant. We read in Luke 1:28, that Mary was called completely and perfectly sanctified or justified by divine grace with a permanent result (kecharitomene). She had no cause to fear the Divine Justice, for she had found favor with God (Lk. 1:30; cf. Isa 61:10). Not unlike a restored Daughter Zion, Mary was “clothed with a robe of salvation” and “wrapped in a mantle of justice” (Isa 61:10). God had looked upon the lowliness of His handmaiden and did great things to her because she was chosen to be God’s personal dwelling place in His physical manifestation, her body being His holy Temple and her womb His sacred sanctuary. Thus, all generations shall call the Virgin Mary blessed, for God has done great things to her, and holy is His name (Lk 1:46-49).

    As with all Catholic Marian doctrines and dogmas, our fuller understanding of Mary’s role in the economy of salvation serves to better illuminate our understanding and deepen our appreciation for her divine Son. Mary’s role as the Ark of the New Covenant underscores the divine truth of who Jesus Christ is: one divine Person in the flesh with both a divine and a human nature hypostatically united, but nonetheless distinct from each other.

    In the words of St. Hippolytus (200 A.D.): “For whereas the Word of God was without flesh, He took upon Himself the holy flesh (the true manna come down from Heaven) by the holy Virgin.” Mary was made holy by the grace of God, for she was predestined to be overshadowed by the Holy Spirit and carry the Divine Presence in the sanctuary of her womb. She truly is the new Ark who was “overlaid with pure gold with the Word within and the Holy Spirit without.” St. Gregory Thaumaturgus (c. A.D. 260) concurs: The Ark of the Covenant is truly fulfilled in the holy Virgin Mother, “gilded within and without,” having “received the treasure of sanctification.” St. Dionysius of Alexandria testifies in accord with this sacred Tradition of the Church: “As Christ, our Priest was not chosen by the hand of man, so neither was His tabernacle framed by men, but was established by the Holy Spirit; and by the power of God is that tabernacle protected” from all putridity and corruption, “to be had in everlasting remembrance, Mary, God’s Virgin Mother.”

    “Behold one in truth, the handmaid of the Lord. Holy she is, in whom is no guile, all simplicity…. The spouse of Christ is the ark of the covenant, within and without overlaid with gold, a keeper of the law of the Lord. As in the ark there was nothing but the tables of the Testament, so too in thee no one from outside should be thought of. Over this propitiatory, as though upon the Cherubim, the Lord is pleased to sit…The Apostle thus defines a virgin, that she should be holy in body and in spirit.”

    St. Jerome, Epist. Xxii.

    (ante A.D. 420)

    40288062_261784844463687_2012067220397490176_n-1

    And Joshua said to the priests, “Take up the ark of the covenant

    and pass on before the people.” So they took up the ark of the covenant

    and went before the people.

    Joshua 3, 6

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    Ave Maria!

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    very good explenation love it GOD BLESS YOU .svaki zupnik triba ovako kako frende iz ukrajne SADA blagoslivlja svoju zajednicu zupe moja HKM STEPINACSt. Hildegard’s secret to a healthy dietShutterstockShare 5Edifa | Apr 20, 2020There is wise advice in some of this saint’s nutritional writing that we can use even today in confinement.Staying healthy and fit in lockdown isn’t easy. There is the ever-present danger of over-eating, consuming unhealthy foods, and gaining extra pounds. We can look to a herbalist and saint named St. Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) for a little wisdom.Hildegard wrote a lot about the virtues of plants and natural foods. In the Hippocratic tradition she prioritized preventive medicine and remedies based on plants. She believed her dietary method allowed a person to feel truly sated while cleansing their liver and intestines, eliminating “black bile,” purifying blood, and maintaining a cheerful disposition.“St. Hildegard simply steers us in the direction of foods apt to improve our vitality,” explains Corinne Graux, a French homeopath. While you should always consult with your health care professionals or a nutritionist about your diet, it’s interesting to consider the dietary advice of Hildegard, as some of it is still worth following today.Avoid “standard” dietsAs a good nutritionist, St. Hildegard had no appetite for standard diets. What’s good for one person is not necessarily beneficial for another. She advocated a personal diet plan based on individual’s health, age, and season.For Hildegard and her contemporaries, everything was a matter of “balancing humors.” She believed a human being, like earth, requires quantities of “lubricants.” This balance was based on the right proportions of hot, cold, dry, and wet foods as much as on good thoughts and deeds. Hence, the saint recommended drinking water (or wine) at mealtime and serving dishes with dressings, meat, or vegetable sauces to prevent food from “drying” the stomach and perturbing digestion. For example, wine vinegar possesses the properties for maintaining the pH in the stomach and intestines, and also prevents the development of blood clots in the arteries.Selecting foods with curative propertiesAccording to Hildegard, “spelt is the very best grain. It provided for good flesh and good blood as well as a cheerful disposition.” Spelt (a distinct form of wheat) cultivation dates back to 10 BC; it was replaced by other wheat in the 20th century. Some 30 years ago, the culture was revived by organic farmers. Having escaped the “selection pressures,” some say its gluten does not attack the intestinal barrier. But specialists still only recommend pure spelt (not having been crossed with other cultures) from certified producers. Some say it’s easier to digest, rich in micro-nutrients, vitamins and prebiotics. In addition, spelt is a good anti-inflammatory and a natural anti-depressant that stimulates the immune system. There are multiple ways to prepare it: porridge, bread, and in desserts.Other foods warmly recommended by Hildegard include: fennel (for its antispasmodic, diuretic and disinfecting properties), chestnuts, green beans and various squashes (zucchinis, red kuri squash, etc.), steamed root vegetables (carrot, parsnip, turnip and celery), onions (always cooked), garlic both fresh and dried, almonds, dates, liver (fried), quinces, Cornelian cherries, apples, and pears. The four indispensable spices used in 11th-century cooking were Spanish chamomile, hyssop, galangal (similar to ginger), and wild thyme.Consume certain foods in moderationSome experts advise that healthy individuals moderate their consumption of tomatoes, eggplant, bell peppers, and potatoes, because of a toxic compound solanine. The same kind of moderation applies to fatty fish (trout, salmon and sardine) destined for healthy individuals. “If a healthy strong person consuming them can be cured and purified with black radish, they will be dangerous for a thin, sickly individual,” observed St. Hildegard. But the same stout person would secrete a putrid substance upon overindulging in honey, she said. Healthy individuals were allowed some milk (preferably in winter time, after it had been macerated with nettles to reduce “harmful juices”). As to pork, she believed its “hot” nature made it toxic for human consumption. (Sorry, bacon lovers!)Toxic foodsHildegard didn’t appreciate leeks, shallots, peaches, plums (unless soaked in wine), strawberries, and fresh vegetables (with the exception of green salad with dressing). She deemed all these foods toxic. According to her, people should also say goodbye to cabbage (bad for digestion), certain kinds of mushrooms, watermelons, and lentils. All these foods are considered healthy by today’s standards, though some people may not tolerate any number of them for various reasons.DietingHildegard was against strict diets leading to loss of both physical and spiritual strength. Instead, in order to let the body rest, she recommended avoiding rich foods at least once a year. According to her, dieting could take the following forms: a bowl of rice or soup with spelt and fennel tea in the evening once or twice a week or a three- or seven-day-long diet alternating pasta and spelt soup with cooked fruit for dessert.Diane GautretRead more:7 Healthy foods that Jesus ateRead more:St. Hildegard’s advice for building healthy self-confidenceThe Novena to St. Catherine of Siena starts today: Here’s why you should pray itCATHERINE OF SIENAPublic DomainShare 245Fr. Patrick Briscoe, OP | Apr 20, 202080% of the population of Siena died the year after her birth because of the Bubonic Plague!The Bubonic plague arrived in Sicily the same year that St. Catherine of Siena was born. The following year, 1348, eighty percent of the population of Siena would die from the disease.Outbreaks of the disease would continue throughout Catherine’s life. One Sienese chronicle reports, “And no bells tolled, and nobody wept no matter what his loss because almost everyone expected death… And people said and believed, ‘This is the end of the world.’” It was a time of philosophical cynicism, political instability, and extraordinary suffering.And yet this was the scene for Catherine’s discovery of her vocation to love God and to love her neighbor.Catherine spent three years of her life in solitude, growing in an intimate relationship with God. This monastic time was filled with many graces and intense prayer. Catherine feared that if she were to re-enter an active, apostolic life (engaging again in worldly affairs), that her relationship with God would suffer.The Lord told Catherine, however,I have no intention of parting you from myself, but rather of making sure to bind you to me all the closer by the bond of your love for your neighbor. Remember I have laid down two commandments of love: love of me and love of your neighbor… It is the justice of these two commandments that I want you now to fulfill. On two feet you must walk my way (Life of St. Catherine of Siena by Raymond of Capua).The marriage of the two great commandments became the rule of her own life. After her years of solitary prayer, Catherine gave herself over to caring for the poor and the sick. Catherine desired to be a servant of others because Christ had been the servant of all and redeemed humanity by his precious blood.In a letter to Caterina di Scetto, another laywoman who belonged to the mantellate in Siena, Catherine describes her vision of charity saying,Take care not to love your neighbor for your own profit, for that would not be responding to the love which God has for you. For as God has loved you gratuitously so he wills that since you cannot love him in this way, you would do so toward your neighbors, loving them, as I said, gratuitously and not as a debt.”For Catherine love of God is where our virtues begin, and in our love of neighbor they come alive. Because this love comes from God, it must be without constraint.Catherine could love in this way because of her total trust in Divine Providence. In a particularly moving passage in her Dialogue, Catherine hears the Lord say to her,Everything was made by me, and without me nothing can exist. Therefore, if it is beauty you want, I am beauty. If you want goodness, I am goodness, for I am supremely good. I am wisdom. I am kind; I am compassionate; I am the just and merciful God.So often charity is inhibited because of a lack of trust in what the Lord is doing. Hearts are held back, growth is stunted by the shadows of doubt that all things belong to the Lord and were redeemed by his blood.As we begin to long for life “post quarantine”; as our neighbors continue to be in need; as we pray for the Church, hoping for renewal in life and vigor, like Catherine, we have to confidently hand everything over to Christ.Despite plague, isolation, the complications of her own family life, and the political turmoil of her day, Catherine gave herself over to love of God and love of neighbor.https://www.youtube.com/embed/BsiXb2Rcvuo?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&autohide=2&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&wmode=transparentMay this novena — which begins April 20 to end on her April 29 feast day — give us the same grace!Novena Prayer:Heavenly Father, your glory is in your saints. We praise your glory in the life of the admirable St. Catherine of Siena, virgin and doctor of the Church. Her whole life was a noble sacrifice inspired by an ardent love of Jesus, your unblemished Lamb.In troubled times she strenuously upheld the rights of His beloved spouse, the Church. Father, honor her merits and hear her prayers for each of us, and for our whole parish family. Help us to pass unscathed through the corruption of this world, and to remain unshakably faithful to the Church in word, deed, and example.Help us always to see in the Vicar of Christ an anchor in the storms of life, and a beacon of light to the harbor of your Love, in this dark night of your times and men’s souls. Grant also to each of us our special petition . . . (State your own intentions)We ask this through Jesus, your Son, in the bond of the Holy Spirit. Amen. St. Catherine of Siena, Pray for us.Read more:How the Church’s Easter prayer to Mary brought the end of the plagueRead more:4 Inspiring women who are “Doctors of the Church”

    Prvo čitanje:Dj 4, 32-37

    Jedno srce i jedna duša.

    Čitanje Djela apostolskih

    U mnoštva onih što prigrliše vjeru bijaše jedno srce i jedna duša. I nijedan od njih nije svojim zvao ništa od onoga što je imao, nego im sve bijaše zajedničko. Apostoli pak velikom silom davahu svjedočanstvo o uskrsnuću Gospodina Isusa i svi uživahu veliku naklonost. Doista nitko među njima nije oskudijevao jer koji bi god posjedovali zemljišta ili kuće, prodavali bi ih i utržak donosili i stavljali pred noge apostolima. A dijelilo se svakomu koliko je trebao.

    A Josip, od apostola prozvan Barnaba, što znači Sin utjehe, levit, rodom Cipranin, posjedovaše jednu njivu; proda je pa donese novac i postavi pred noge apostolima.

    Riječ Gospodnja.

    Sr. Gaudia Skass, OLM | Apr 20, 2020

    It’s also what Jesus most desires to give us …

    There is nothing more that man needs than Divine Mercy – that love which is benevolent, which is compassionate, which raises man above his weakness to the infinite heights of the holiness of God.

    St. John Paul II shared these striking words during his pilgrimage to the Shrine of Divine Mercy in Cracow in 1997. These words, but even more his life, show us his deep understanding of the mystery of the Heart of God, and the mystery of the human heart.

    From the very depths of our inmost beings we cry out for someone who will look upon us with empathy, understanding our imperfections and struggles and seeing beyond them. Whether aware or not all human hearts are crying out for the merciful God. His heart is filled to overflowing with compassion for us. He is not scandalized with our misery. He never tires of forgiving. He is always ready to generously bestow graces upon us, even more than we dare to ask for.

    He is not scandalized with our misery.

    The mystery of God’s merciful love is what we meditate upon in a special way during the seasons of Lent and Easter. Jesus’ Passion, Death and Resurrection speak to us most powerfully about the inconceivable love of God for us. Therefore, to crown these most holy days we’ve been given the celebration of Divine Mercy Sunday on the last day of the Easter Octave.

    St. John Paul II instituted this feast of Divine Mercy for the universal Church exactly 20 years ago, in 2000; he died on its Vigil five years later, in 2005; he was beatified on Divine Mercy Sunday in 2011; and he was canonized, again on this very Solemnity of Divine Mercy, in 2014. Whoever is able to read the signs of the times, let him read.

    St. John Paul II, the Pope of Mercy, by establishing this new feast in the Church fulfilled Jesus’ desire expressed almost 70 years earlier to Sr. Faustina. Jesus said to her:

    My daughter, tell the whole world about My inconceivable Mercy. I desire that the Feast of Mercy be a refuge and shelter for all souls, and especially for poor sinners. On that day the very depths of My tender Mercy are open. I pour out a whole ocean of graces upon those souls who approach the fount of My Mercy. The soul that will go to Confession and receive Holy Communion shall obtain complete forgiveness of sins and punishment. On that day all the divine floodgates through which graces flow are open. Let no soul fear to draw near to Me, even though its sins be as scarlet. My Mercy is so great that no mind, be it of man or of angel, will be able to fathom it throughout all eternity. (…) The Feast of Mercy emerged from My very depths of tenderness. It is My desire that it be solemnly celebrated on the first Sunday after Easter. Mankind will not have peace until it turns to the fount of My Mercy. (Diary, 699)

    Our distressed world is suffering from lack of hope, sinking in the sea of depression. A stark example of this is a worldwide statistic published by the World Health Organization: a person takes his/her own life every 40 seconds! In contrast to this rising level of despair in life, God’s desire is that we would all have life in fullness, now and forever!

    Jesus’ words from St. Faustina’s Diary are filled with passionate love for his children. The word desire appears 306 times in her journal. That very fact alone reveals to us the merciful Face of the caring God, whose love is like a burning fire! He desires that the Feast of Mercy be a refuge and shelter for all souls. The mere reference to a “refuge” and a “shelter” clearly implies that we are threatened, that there is a dangerous enemy who is prowling around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour (1 Peter 5:8). Our enemy is real, but usually stays hidden and therefore more dangerous. In addition to this spiritual enemy, we are threatened by the world that surrounds us, and which we often underestimate. And we are threatened by our personal sinful inclinations and choices, which we too easily justify.

    God gives himself to us fully, He offers us His own Heart, and all It contains, first and foremost in the sacraments. When we look at the Divine Mercy image, we see the rays gushing forth from Jesus’ heart. They symbolize the purifying and life-giving sacraments – most of all His merciful presence in the sacrament of Baptism and Confession and in the Eucharist. He is patiently waiting there for us with hands overflowing with gifts! Too often He waits too long, and to no avail….

    It could be a temptation for those of us who are not experiencing the tsunami of the world’s darkness, or who are already nourishing a healthy relationship with God, to undervalue our own personal need for Divine Mercy, to doubt truly that, in my case, ‘there is nothing more that I need,’ as John Paul II says. If this is indeed a doubt lingering in the recesses of our consciousness, may this Feast Day be an occasion for us to ask for the grace to see what God has done for us, and is doing for us; the grace to see that our very stability and goodness are themselves the work of his mercy. May it also be the occasion for an examination of conscience:

    In this aching world God’s inconceivable, unimaginable, incredible mercy should be preached on the rooftops and shared in some way in every conversation. How many souls could be saved if we only used well the opportunities given to us?! The gift of time, the gift of encounters with other people: whether a friend or a stranger, the other is always a brother, a sister, a child of the same Father, and perhaps completely unaware of this divine connection. Perhaps those who cross our path have no idea of all the blessings prepared for them by God in His loving plan for their lives, perhaps they do not see the meaning of their lives. How are we using the opportunities of time and our encounters with others to share with them the good news of God’s great mercy? Let us then humbly turn to our merciful Father in a simple but zealous prayer asking Him to open our eyes and hearts so that we would first gratefully receive and then enthusiastically share His mercy with everyone whom we meet.

    St. John Paul II encouraged all of us: Be apostles of Divine Mercy! Let us feel called to carry the message of God’s benevolent and compassionate love to all, so that through us He may heal all wounded hearts and restore all broken lives.

    ~

    The Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy together with the Staff lead a Divine Mercy ministry at Saint John Paul II National Shrine in Washington, D.C.

    Read more:

    Did Jesus visit his Mother first on Easter morning? Here’s why JPII said “probably so”

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